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2012, end of internet
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Cpt_Zim83
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Joined: 05 Nov 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 11:17 pm    Post subject: 2012, end of internet Reply with quote

If this is true, I'm really PO! Fou And if it is call you congress man and say NO!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2XPiqhN_Ns
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ottoman
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you kidding? It would never happen. And I will tell you why. Companies rely on the internet to make a good chunk of their change. It is almost on the tops of the list in terms of entertainment value. So to say the internet will die in four years is absurd.

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Thanks to all that supported my site for 7 years, I hope to see you at my site, rocketpowerheat.tripod.com! Sourire Très content
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Mike2000
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oookey...


Now, if this was such a groundbreaking news, how come we haven't seen anything like that on the news? And I don't only mean the general newscasts, but also the NYSE or other stock exchange reports. We should have seen Google, Yahoo! and the other search engines' stocks skyrocket due to an intensified buying campaign in sight of the upcoming contracts. And Wikipedia, which is also shown in that mock-up offering, is a paradigm of free software and collaboration works, not the property of a commercially-based corporation, and thus the core soure of the information it has depends on the general public that create and maintain it.

"...Ask any ISP provider... if you have high-level contacts there ask them... they might tell you..." Yeah, right. If this was a serious periodistical research and had the goal of actually stopping what they say as a "threat to the Internet as we know it", they would have shown their sources. "Most major ISPs...", who are those major ISPs they contacted? Names, buddies, give us names. "We can't because we are breaking the non-disclosure clause...", then why go to this lenght and produce a home-made clip that is shown (where else?) on Youtube, showing their faces, instead of sending it to the major news agencies "in condition of anonimity" and let them do the dirty job of spilling the beans? Because no self-respecting newscast with a minimum quality control of its sources would accept this.

It is evident that Internet as we know it will not last forever. The concept and the technology is advancing quickly; those old enough to have been surfing the Net since the early 1990s will probably remember that, back in the day, we didn't even have such niceties as frames or multimedia, and the only animations we had were made by GIFs. We've come a long way from the early one-way, text-only sites of yesteryear to the current trend of collaborative information exchange, e-commerce, forums, advanced multimedia and such. And the demands on the bandwidth have increased exponentially with the new multimedia features we enjoy. Why do you think they had to develop standards like the MP3 audio encoding format, for example? Why, just go to Yahoo! today and you'll find a whole American Express TV commercial embedded in their news pages, which is quite annoying, IMHO.

So yeah, we will witness a change in the way we get access to the net; we will have to buy faster internet connections and such things as broadband will have to become commonplace in the near future if we are to turn the Internet into a major entertainment infrastructure like the TV was in the 1960s and 1970s, or radio was before that. And that technology will have to cost more. We'll see problems arising from the lack of available IP addresses for new servers, and we'll most likely see legal regulations passed everywhere to control the types of contents available on the Net. BUT, and this is the most important thing, the Internet is a global phenomenon, not only a U.S. based enterprise; such commercial practices as mentioned in this clip would have to meet not only U.S. congress' approval, but also that of the other countries involved or using the Net, and trust me, knowing how congresses usually work, that won't happen before pigs start to fly. And to work, they would depend on the users to have fast Internet access, or otherwise it wouldn't be attractive to people to spend money on a service that would not work properly. And right now, less than 10 percent of the global Internet users have broadband access. Even today, a lot of people use an old-fashioned modem to connect. And there are still millions of people around the world without Internet access at all, the so-called "digital divide".

One of the major attractions of the Internet is that the information you find there is created by the most part by individual users, not companies. The moment you take individual users off the equation, you'll have the very same effects as in TV: you'll see a sharp decline in the use of the net infrastructure and thus the advertising value of the net will drop. Bad juju for anyone trying to sell ads in the major sites; the Internet would go back to what it once was: a communication network to exchange data between organizations. Probably most of the traffic would revert to e-mail and specialized discussion boards. If you take users off the equation by hindering their ability to freely post and search for information, soon the search engines (which you would pay to use) would not have new information to show, and their worthiness would be reduced until they simply dry out. They would simply kill their business. No; most likely you'll see more ads in popular, high-traffic sites like Yahoo!, google, even Wikipedia or others, but they would PAY the sites to put their ads there. You, as user, wouldn't have to pay a dime to use them. It would be like paying cable TV to see even more ads there than in public TV.

You must always take any information like this that you find on the Net with a grain of salt. Ok, so they are a group of young people with groundbreaking news that they want to make public to increase awareness; again, if they really wanted to create awareness, why produce a home-made videoclip and post it on Youtube, where it will certainly get exposure but not credibility? They should have gone to, say, CNN, or better yet, to news agencies like Reuters or Associated Press and show their evidence, so that the news agencies could corroborate it and prepare a note that would have a much larger impact.

Sorry to bust these guys' bubble, but this is nothing more than just another Internet hoax like so many before.
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Cpt_Zim83
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Few, I hope you're right. I had no way of acually knowing how true this video was. That's why I posted it on here. You guys are usally pretty good when it comes to getting answers strait. Sourire
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Mike2000
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

you're most welcome. Sourire Besides, in case you still have any doubt, think about this: a merger of this sort would mean the ISPs were planning to create a monopoly to control the use and access of a technological platform that is already considered a vital part of the development of any country. That alone would be against U.S. antitrust laws (those forbiding the creation of monopolies and practices intended to hinder competition), not to mention that the same would be true for most governments around the globe. Seeing how most governments and international organizations like the World Bank, the UN, the OCDE and others, consider the Internet a vital tool in levering knowledge and developing abilities for their citizens, it would be quite unlikely they would permit a group of companies to take over control of this infrastructure and turn it into a "pay-per-view" system of sorts. It just wouldn't happen.

Now, they MIGHT consolidate some search engines and MIGHT make them a subscription-based service, but they would have to offer some mighty good services to compensate the users and convince them to use the paying services instead of the new, free, open-source search engines that would likely follow.

So, don't you worry: the Internet as we know it will change and evolve, it will most likely feature paid ads in sites, but the ultimate reason for it to work and be so attractive to investors and advertisers is because a lot of people use it. And people use it because it is "free", of course excluding the costs of connection and equipment needed to use it. The moment they start charging to get access to the information per se, that moment a lot of people will turn to other forms of entertainment (read: ipods, cell phones and such), and the net value of the net as an advertising tool will diminish. So, rest assured: there can't possibly exist a world without the Internet anymore, just like there can't be a world without television anymore. The Net is here to stay, and it will evolve and prosper in years to come, well beyond that new magic date of 2012. Clin d'oeil
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BeverlyHillsChick
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 3:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is it about the year 2012, anyway? People are making it sound like it's going to be Y2K all over again. (Remember that?)

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Mike2000
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 3:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How can I forget it? XD I spent the whole New Year's eve watching over my servers in my job, hoping none of them caught fire or turned into cabbagges after the clock hit midnight! XD

... anyway, it seems to be the newest trendy doomsday date. Back in my time, they said that "the world's gonna end in 2000"... and here we are, eight years later, still trying to pick a magic day. Humans. XD
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Rebekah 10
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll never forget Y2K I was all worked up about it but heck I was only 12. New Years eve my cousin flickered the lights as New Years rolled around. How insane is that?

I just don't see that actually happening. I see the interent getting bigger and bigger in the next four years not crashing.
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knoodelhed
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course, there is special significance that some ascribe to the date of Friday, 21 December 2012. The calendar devised by the Maya Indians of Central America will reset itself to 13-0-0-0-0, much like the odometer of an old car passing from 99,999.9 to 00,000.0...or like a 12-hour analog clock displaying noon (or, as the case may be, midnight).
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Mike2000
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, yeah. The old Maya calendar... "they didn't calculate any dates past 2012, ergo, they were predicting the world would end by 2012...", yadah, yadah, yadah.

What this really means is that, by that ancient count, we'll live in a date like this:

13 Baktun, 0 katun, 0 tun, 0 winal, 0 kin

This is the date, or more exactly, the number of days that have passed since the "zero date" the mayas used to calculate their dates. Now, the equivalences are roughly this:

1 kin = 1 day
1 winal = 20 days (20 kin)
1 tun = 360 days (18 winal)
1 katun = 7200 days (20 tun)
1 baktun = 144,000 days (20 katun)

translating this "long count" date, as it is called:

13.0.0.0.0 = 13 times 144,000 days (13 baktun) + 0 times 7,200 days (0 katun) + 0 times 360 days (0 tun) + 0 times 20 days (0 winal) + 0 days (0 kin) = 1,872,000 days since they started counting, which is, roughly, 5,128 years. (1,872,000 days / 365)

That's all. ^^

The following day (Saturday, december 22, 2012) will be represented as 13.0.0.0.1 in the Mayan calendar, then Sunday, december 23 will be 13.0.0.0.2, and so on, until January 10, 2013 when the date will be 13.0.0.1.0. Like Scott said, think of this pretty much like the odometer of a car: January 11 will be 13.0.0.1.1, and so on.


Last edited by Mike2000 on Sat Jun 07, 2008 2:18 am; edited 1 time in total
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Rebekah 10
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2008 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think I actually caught any of that. How did you figure all those numbers and ancient words about the Mayans? I just remember in school talking about them and being off by 33 seconds and the world will end by December 2012.
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Mike2000
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2008 2:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can find more information on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maya_calendar#Long_Count

Basically, this calendar system, like ours, merely counts how many days have passed since a given date. Ours use the birth of Christ as our zero date, and we've been counting the days grouping them in cycles of weeks, months, years, centuries, and millenia. The Maya did the same, but they grouped the days in a slightly different way than us.
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Cpt_Zim83
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2008 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's true. This isn't the first time that calender system as reset. Unlike our calender that only has 12 months, as Mike2000 explained, their calender has 75 years. It's no wonder that it's considered one of the most acurite calenders ever made.
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bearbear
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No big deal that the calendar is reverting... they obviously didn't think hugely far ahead.
It's like our computers made right up until the late 90s that didn't think about representing the year 2000. Rire

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Mike2000
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rire I still remember those. When I first started working with computers, we all used to store dates using only the last two digits of the year. Nevermind that the year 2000 would be represented as "00", we never expected our computers or programs to last that long to ever worry about those missing digits. And ho, suddenly it was 1999... and we all panicked!!! Surpris Rire Tire la langue
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